Staff – University of Copenhagen

Martina Skrubbeltrang Mahnke

Martina Skrubbeltrang Mahnke

Postdoc

Martina Skrubbeltrang Mahnke works currently as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, where she is associated with the HumanImpact project. HumanImpact is the first Danish attempt to systematically supply Danish companies with specialized humanistic knowledge about their customers. The project, which is anchored at the Faculty of Humanities, is funded by the Danish Industry Foundation. The main purpose of the project is to connect Danish companies with leading humanities researchers to strengthen companies' innovation capacity and competitiveness.


Martina received her doctoral degree in communication and media studies from the University of Erfurt, Germany and is beyond that formally educated as a media designer. She holds further a continuing education degree from the Rhode Island School of Design, USA. Prior to her current position she worked as a course manager and postdoctoral researcher at the IT University of Denmark and was involved in activities located at the crossroad of design, communication and technology. Amongst other obligations she was responsible for the graduate class “Communication Design“, which engaged in the integration of communication theory and hands-on design thinking tools. As an educator Martina’s work focusses on creating non-hierarchical, dialogical learning spaces that equally involve academia and industry partners.


As a researcher Martina engages mainly in questions related to social media and digital citizenship. Drawing on qualitative interview material she is currently looking at how young Danes critically reflect on their own social media use. Other research projects she is involved in are related to algorithmic narratives and understanding algorithms as communicative constructs. This work a continuation of her PhD research, where she conducted interviews with programmers and users of social media applications. Drawing on this material she is looking at how programmers and users talk and make sense of algorithms and what that means for the role and place given to them in digital society.

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